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LIVING FLORAL ART APPEARS AT THE NATIONAL GALLERY

Some say art lives forever; today, The National Gallery disproved this when a new living, breathing 35-square metre painting was revealed, painstakingly put together with 26,430 real cut flowers

The display was commissioned by Funnyhowflowersdothat, a not-for-profit initiative from the Flower Council of Holland that supports all areas of the cut flower industry, to mark the new partnership between the organisation and the National Gallery’s Dutch Flowers exhibition. 

The massive art installation pays homage to the masterpiece by Dutch artist Ambrosius Bosschaert the Elder – A Still Life of Flowers in a Wan-Li Vase (1609-10), that is displayed in the Dutch Flower exhibition. 

‘We are excited to be working with the National Gallery for this very special display as we both bring joy and inspiration through beauty,’ said Chanel de Kock, UK Marketing Manager from funnyhowflowersdothat.co.uk

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‘Artistic representations of flowers have been a central theme in the history of art, with the blooms in those paintings becoming iconic and timeless in their own right. We want visitors to look at flowers more closely, almost the same way these master painters did. People visiting the Gallery from the UK and around the world will be able to see these paintings brought together in one room, and also have the chance to experience a very special kind of bouquet.’

The art installation took the creativity and precision of almost 30 florists and over two days of labor to arrange. The display weighs 1,815 kilograms and is made up of 100 blocks of florist’s foam. The piece is constructed from 26,430 stems, 26 varieties of flowers and 37 different colors to create shading  and dimension within the piece. 

This floral masterpiece is fleeting; head to the National Gallery soon, because it’s only on display until Monday 6 June. 

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