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Gary Oldman Namechecks South London in Emotional Oscar Speech

New Cross-born Gary Oldman, whose acting career spans four decades, has finally won his first Oscar, and not only does he namecheck south London, he also tells his mum to ‘put the kettle on’

The visibly emotional Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy star name checked south London and thanked his mother, asking her to ‘put the kettle on’, in his acceptance speech for Best Actor in a Leading Role for Darkest Hour at the 90th Academy Awards.

The war drama portrays Winston Churchill in his early days as Prime Minister, grappling with the rising threat of Nazi Germany sweeping across Western Europe.

Beating fellow nominees Denzel Washington, Daniel Day-Lewis, Timothee Chalamet and Daniel Kaluuya, Oldman said that the Oscar was a ‘glorious prize’ that he owed to ‘so many’.

Gary Oldman accepts the Oscar for Best Actor in a Leading Role in Darkest Hour at the 90th Academy Awards (photo: Michael Yada / A.M.P.A.S.)

Gary Oldman backstage after winning Best Actor in a Leading Role in Darkest Hour at the 90th Academy Awards (photo: Michael Yada / A.M.P.A.S.)

He went on to say that, ‘The movies, such as their power, captivated a young man from south London and gave him a dream’, and that he ‘would just like to salute Sir Winston Churchill, who has been marvellous company on what can be described as an incredible journey and my wife Gisele for travelling that road with me and being at my side.’

Oldman studied with the Young People’s Theatre in Greenwich during the mid-1970s (now the Greenwich & Lewisham Young People’s Theatre). He unsuccessfully applied to the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA), which welcomed him to try again the following year, but advised him to find something else to do for a living.

The movies, such as their power, captivated a young man from south London and gave him a dream

He then won a scholarship to the Rose Bruford College in Sidcup, which also counts the likes of Tom Baker (Doctor Who, Blackadder), Hayley Squires (I, Daniel Blake) and Pat St. Clement (EastEnders) among its alumni. Oldman’s sister, Laila Morse, played Big Mo in EastEnders for a number of years.

Finally, the charming actor said he would like to thank his mother, ‘who is older than the Oscar, she is 99 years young next birthday and she’s watching the ceremony from the comfort of her sofa.

‘I say to my mother thank you for your love and support, um… put the kettle on, I’m bringing Oscar home.’

Watch the full acceptance speech here:



 

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