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Townhouses Usurp Penthouses as Londoners Seek Privacy & Their Own Front Door

Coronavirus has changed the way we look at a lot of things, including property. While glassy penthouses and hotel-style lobbies have their charm, self-contained homes with their own front door are getting a lot of attention…

Lockdown has made many of us re-evaluate our choices. For some, their home has certainly become their castle, with spacious private gardens a most precious resource.

For others, central London living, removing the need to cram onto busy public transport to get to work, is paramount – and that often means moving into one of the glassy new property developments springing up across Zone 1.

But do those hotel-style lobbies, shared work spaces and communal residents’ spaces still hold the same appeal when a global pandemic threatens the lifestyle to which we’ve become accustomed?

Once in a while a property will come along that combines the best of both worlds, and this Mayfair townhouse at 76 Park Street ticks those self-isolation boxes and then some.

The Grade II listed Georgian townhouse offers a rare buying opportunity. Park Street is the longest street on the Grosvenor Estate, with numbers 70 to 78 the only surviving original Georgian properties, making number 76 one of the most desirable addresses in Mayfair.

Grosvenor Square and Hanover Square were first laid-out in 1710 and 1719 respectively by Sir Richard Grosvenor and the Earl of Scarborough, and by the 1720s development had begun and the surrounding fields of Mayfair were becoming new homes for the aristocracy.

In the following decades, ‘new money’ threatened the survival of original Georgian townhouses of Mayfair as business owners tore them down to build lavish mansions in the 1850s. Further homes destroyed in the 1930s to build new hotels, offices and apartment buildings.

Since the 1980s, however, Mayfair’s residential heritage became coveted once again and these few remaining original homes are highly sought-after.

‘The opportunity to purchase freehold an original Mayfair townhouse, that has remained a family home over the centuries, is a rare occurrence,’ says Peter Wetherell, Chief Executive of Wetherell, the sole agent for the sale of this property.

Since lockdown restrictions were first brought into effect across London, buyers are increasingly wanting self-contained homes or individual houses with their own front door.

‘Our clients are increasingly health-conscious and want homes without communal access or shared areas, with the limited number of original townhouses in Mayfair now a very sought-after asset.’

Number 76 Park Street is a four-storey, four-bedroom home boasting a carefully preserved façade, with sash windows and shutters, cast iron balustrades and monochromatic Georgian floor tiles to the entrance.

Since lockdown restrictions were first brought into effect across London, buyers are increasingly wanting self-contained homes or individual houses with their own front door’

The 2,586 sq ft townhouse has a private patio and two south-facing terraces, which is an enviable amount of outdoor space in central W1.

On the ground floor, there is a grand dining room with bespoke panelling on the walls and a historic fireplace, while the contemporary kitchen with integrated appliances means you can enjoy the best of both the old and new worlds.

The first floor has a drawing room with sash windows overlooking the street, an ornate fireplace and impressive ceiling heights. There is also a guest bedroom with a private terrace and family shower room.

The master suite takes over the entire second floor, complete with a large bathroom finished in a marble-effect and a spacious south-facing private roof terrace.

The lower-ground floor has a smart study and a children’s playroom that leads onto a quiet patio, as well as another guest bedroom with en suite bathroom.

Number 76 Park Street is also a short walk from Hyde Park and Grosvenor Square, and less than a five-minute walk to Marble Arch underground station for a swift commute to the City.

And when lockdown measures are eased enough that restaurants can reopen, Michel Roux Jr.’s famous restaurant Le Gavroche on Upper Brook Street – the UK’s first ever restaurant to be awarded two Michelin stars – is just yards away.

76 Park Street is on the market for £5.5 million (freehold) with Wetherell. Call 020 7529 5566 or visit wetherell.co.uk



 

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