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RUGBY WORLD CUP 2015: THE PROPERTY WINNERS AND LOSERS

New data reveals how the Rugby World Cup venues have had a positive effect on house prices in each area

Remember the Property Premier League? It’s not just football stadiums that have had an impact on house prices. Online estate agent urban.co.uk has revealed the ‘Rugby Ranking’ of the 13 Rugby World Cup venues in England and Wales – and every location has seen growth. 

It’s no surprise to hear the World Cup’s London venues have profited more than others and take the top three places on the list. However, while Twickenham Stadium will host the opening and closing games of the tournament, it hasn’t seen the greatest increase in property value over the last five years. Instead, it’s The Stadium at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park in Stratford which takes the number one spot. This East London venue has seen seen prices grow by 35.6%, taking 2010’s average value of £310,863 to £421,542 today.

rugby property price ranking

Twickenham takes second place in the ranking, with properties up 28.6% from five years ago. This South West London neighbourhood is also where you’ll find the most expensive homes across the World Cup venues. Today’s average is £557,305.

The area around Wembley Stadium has also seen significant growth and is third on the list. Over the last five years, average prices are up 28.3% from £324,921 in 2010 to £417,013 today. 

Outside of London, Cardiff’s Millennium Stadium takes eighth place in the Rugby Ranking. Here, the 11.2% property price growth means 2010’s £160,133 average value has risen to £178,144 in 2015.

Following closely behind is the only south west World Cup venue, Exeter’s Sandy Park, where prices have grown by 11.1% since 2010’s £225,325. Today’s average value of £250,273 places Devon’s stadium in 9th place.

‘It is clear that being close to a UK rugby venue can have an effect on house prices but it is interesting to see how much this can vary across the country,’ says Adam Male, Founder of Urban.co.uk. ‘Whilst the affluent south-east is known to have seen rapid property price growth in recent times, other areas across the UK, such as Milton Keynes and Leicester, appear to have also witnessed impressive increases in the past five years when you look close to the key stadium locations.’

See the full Rugby Ranking list below:

1. The Stadium at Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park, Stratford – Average House Price 2010 £310,863. Average House Price 2015 £421,542 (35.6% increase)

2. Twickenham Stadium, Twickenham – Average House Price 2010 £433,527. Average House Price 2015 £557,305 (28.6% increase)

3. Wembley Stadium, Wembley – Average House Price 2010 £324,921. Average House Price 2015 £417,013 (28.3% increase)

4. Brighton Community Stadium, Brighton – Average House Price 2010 £315,948. Average House Price 2015 £386,296 (22.3% increase)

5. Stadium MK, Milton Keynes – Average House Price 2010 £177,143. Average House Price 2015 £210,936 (19.1% increase)

6. Leicester City Stadium, Leicester – Average House Price 2010 £182,911. Average House Price 2015 £206,042 (12.6% increase)

7. Manchester City Stadium, Manchester – Average House Price 2010 £101,079. Average House Price 2015 £112,966 (11.8% increase)

8. Millennium Stadium, Cardiff – Average House Price 2010 £160,133. Average House Price 2015 £178,144 (11.2% increase)

9. Sandy Park, Exeter – Average House Price 2010 £225,325. Average House Price 2015 £250,273 (11.1% increase)

10. St James’ Park, Newcastle upon Tyne – Average House Price 2010 £145,899. Average House Price 2015 £160,077 (9.7% increase)

11. Kingsholm Stadium, Gloucester – Average House Price 2010 £135,395. Average House Price 2015 £148,287 (9.5% increase)

12. Elland Road, Leeds – Average House Price 2010 £86,626. Average House Price 2015 £94,742 (9.4% increase)

13. Villa Park, Birmingham – Average House Price 2010 £96,493. Average House Price 2015 £104,518 (8.3% increase)

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